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All the material on this website is copyrighted to J-P Metsavainio, if not otherwise stated. Any content on this website may not be reproduced without the author’s permission.

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Happy Halloween



A ghostly figure from deep space, IC 63

A natural color composition of IC 63

Happy Halloween!

I originally shot this target at Halloween night of the year 2010.
I didn't plan to shoot a seasonal theme image, just followed my imaging plan. When the image first time appeared in my screen at Halloween night, I felt cold fingers at my back...

Original image and the imaging data can be seen here:

A version in HST-palette





Sunday, October 21, 2012

I want to know




I WANT TO KNOW


If someone want this poster get printed. please leave a comment here.


I get inspired by a poster, seen in TV-series X-files.
(Mulder's poster hangs in the wall of X-files basement office.)

I tried to find out the copyright holder for this poster to give a credit here.
It  turned out, that it was made just for the TV-series by the production team.


Images used in the "I want to know" poster above are shot by me.
Messier 104: http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2010/05/final-version-of-m104-sombrero-galaxy.html
The Moon: http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2011/09/moon-images-from-new-point-of-view.html


New imaging project, the "Pickering's Triangle"



Last night was clear! I managed to get ~5h H-alpha exposures for the "Pickering's Triangle" in the Veil Nebula supernova remnant.
This is a dim target, I'll need additional exposures for this. Together, with S-II and O-III exposures, about 15 more hours is needed for a good signal to noise. 



 "Pickering's Triangle"
A detail from the Veil Nebula supernova remnant

H-alpha, 15x1200s =5h


A closeup



Orientation in the Veil Nebula

Area of interest is marked as a white rectangle


Technical details:

Processing work flow:
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Levels and curvesin PS CS3.

Optics, Meade LX200 GPS 12" @ f5
Camera, QHY9
Guiding, SXV-AO, an active optics unit, and Lodestar guide camera
Image Scale, ~0,8 arc-seconds/pixel
165 x 1200s exposures for H-alpha emission = 5h 


















Saturday, October 20, 2012

EPIC II









Testing of the theory, part 2
Any phrase looks epic, if placed in front of an astronomical image...


Image used at background is an image shot by me at 2010.
Details can be seen here:



Ps.
I got this idea from Professor Matt McBee, thanks Matt.



Friday, October 19, 2012

EPIC










Testing of the theory

Any phrase looks epic, if placed in front of an astronomical image...




Image used at background is my first light for the Autumn season 2012.
Details can be seen here:




Ps.
I got this idea from Professor Matt McBee, thanks Matt.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

IC 1340, project finalized



Finally, after waiting four weeks for a clear night, I was able to finalize this project last night by shooting the missing S-II channel (light from the ionized Sulfur)



IC 1340, Part of the Eastern Veil Nebula in Cygnus
RA: 20h56m 45.8s DE:+31 degrees07' 17"

Image is in mapped colors, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.

IC 1340 is part of the Veil Nebula, a supernova remnant in constellation Cygnus at distance of about 1470 light years. This is one of the more luminous areas in this SNR. Image is B&W, since it shows only a light emitted by ionized Hydrogen. The shock front formed by the material ejected from giant explosion, the super nova, can be seen in this image.


Orientation
Note. an apparent size of the Moon is at lower Right corner.

The area of interest is shown with a rectangle and the size of the Moon with a circle. 



Image in visual spectrum from the same material

Image is in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, 
R=Hydrogen + Sulfur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + Hydrogen.


Technical details:

Processing work flow:
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Levels, curves and color combine in PS CS3.

Optics, Meade LX200 GPS 12" @ f5
Camera, QHY9
Guiding, SXV-AO, an active optics unit, and Lodestar guide camera
Image Scale, ~0,8 arc-seconds/pixel
16 x 1200s exposures for H-alpha emission = 5h 20min.
12 x 1200s exposures for O-III, emission of ionized Oxygen = 4h
12 x 1200s exposures for S-II, emission of ionized Sulfur = 4h
Total exposure time 13h 20min.



Ps.

Stars vs starless animation

Soetimes it's easier to see deatils in the nebula, if the stars are removed.



Monday, October 15, 2012

An experiental 3D-animation from my image of NGC 6752



I have tested a new method to publish my 3D-images as a form of Lenticular prints.
For this technique to work, I need series of images from different angles, in this case 24 images are needed.
Lenticular printing is actually an old technique but in past few years it has become much more sophisticated.
The results can be stunning visually, image plane disappears and object floats in and outside of the frame.

Since astronomical objects are too far away, no real parallax can be imaged. Doe to that, I have developed a method to turn my images to a various 3D-formats. My work flow is based on scientific data from the object, distance and the source of ionization are usually known. The different types of the nebulae has typical structures. Pillar like formations must point to the source of ionization. The radiation pressure forms kind of hollow area, inside of the nebula, around newly born stars. Dark nebulae must be at front of the emission ones to show, etc... Rest of the missing information is then replaced with an artistic vision.
The whole process is pretty much like sculpting!

NOTE! This is a personal vision about forms and shapes, based on some known facts and an artistic impression.

A globular cluster, NGC 6752, as an animated 3D-study
Please, let the image load, the size is ~6.5MB

24-frames, images are meant for a lenticular 3D-print. Hence only limited horizontal animation. If needed, I'm able to do whole "fly around" animation out of the same 3D-model, used for the image above.
NOTE. Only image elements from the original 2D-image are used for this 3D-model.


Original 2D image of the object

Image of the NGC 6752 from the year 2010
Original blog post, with technical info, can be seen here:

What are globular clusters?

First of all, they are very beautiful, visually and imaged! A globular cluster is a spherical collection of stars that orbits a galactic core as a satellite. Globular clusters are very tightly bound by gravity, which gives them their spherical shapes and relatively high stellar densities toward their centers. The name of this category of star cluster is derived from the Latin globulus—a small sphere. A globular cluster is sometimes known more simply as a globular.
Globular clusters, which are found in the halo of a galaxy, contain considerably more stars and are much older than the less dense galactic, or open clusters, which are found in the disk. Globular clusters are fairly common; there are about 150 to 158 currently known globular clusters in the Milky Way.
A screenshot from the 3D-modeling software

A screen shot from the TrueSpace modeling software. This kind of model gives much more freedoms to animate, than is used in this example. A series of 24 images, with about one degree increments, are needed for the lenticular 3D print.


A collection of my experimental 3D-studies, of astronomical objects, can be found from my portfolio:
3D-material is under a folder "Volumetric 3D images"





Tuesday, October 9, 2012

An experiental 3D-animation from my image of Veil Nebula SNR



I have tested a new method to publish my 3D-images as a form of Lenticular prints.
For this technique to work, I need series of images from different angles, in this case 24 images are needed.
Lenticular printing is actually an old technique but in past few years it has become much more sophisticated.
The results can be stunning visually, image plane disappears and object floats in and outside of the frame.

Since astronomical objects are too far away, no real parallax can be imaged. Doe to that, I have developed a method to turn my images to various 3D-formats. My work flow is based on scientific data from the object, distance and the source of ionization are usually known. The different types of the nebulae has typical structures, pillar like formations must point to the source of ionization, the radiation pressure forms kind of hollow area, inside of the nebula, around newly born stars, dark nebulae must be at front of the emission ones to show, etc... rest of the missing information is then replaced with an artistic vision.
The whole process is pretty much like sculpting!


Veil Nebula, supernova remnant, as an animation
Click for a large image

Please, wait for few moments for animation to load, the size is ~7MB

NOTE. Only real data from the original 2D-image is used for the 3D-animation!

This animation shows the estimated shape of the Veil Nebula. It has to be more or less spherical due to nature of the supernova explosion.

Generally images about space objects shows them flat as a paintings in a canvas but in reality, they are volumes floating in three dimensional space. The purpose of my work is to show how I personally see those distant objects in my mind and they are fun to do!
The accuracy of the model depends how well I have known, figured out and guessed. Right or wrong, if my 3D experiments are giving something to think, they are working well.


The original 2D-image of the Veil Nebula

I shot this image at Autumn season 2011. The blog post with information and technical details can be seen here: http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/03/veil-nebula-reprocessed-with-some-new.html
Buy a photographic print from HERE

The apparent scale of the Veil Nebula

Many nebulae are very large in the sky. This image series shows the apparent size of the Veil Nebula compared to size of the Moon. (The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.)


Click for a large image
Note. The apparent size of the Moon is marked as a white circle for a scale.


An experimental fly a round movie of Veil Nebula
 Few years back I made a movie out of the Veil Nebula.

HD-format (720x1280) To see this in Youtube: KLICK HERE
Please, klick the "gear symbol" in Youtube to select high resolution. Double click the movie window to see it in full screen.
-
Original video can be downloaded from HERE



Wednesday, October 3, 2012

An experimental 3D-animation from my image of IC 1396




I have tested a new method to publish my 3D-images as a form of Lenticular prints.
For this technique to work, I need series of images from different angles, in this case 24 images are needed. 
Lenticular printing is actually an old technique but in past few years it has become much more sophisticated.
The results can be stunning visually, image plane disappears and object floats in and outside of the frame.

Since astronomical objects are too far away, no real parallax can be imaged. Doe to that, I have developed a method to turn my images to various 3D-formats. My work flow is based on scientific data from the object, distance and the source of ionization are usually known. The different types of the nebulae has typical structures, pillar like formations must point to the source of ionization, the radiation pressure forms kind of hollow area, inside of the nebula, around newly born stars, dark nebulae must be at front of the emission ones to show, etc... rest of the missing information is then replaced with an artistic vision.
The whole process is pretty much like sculpting! 

An image set of IC 1396, used for a lenticular print, as an animation. 
(More of my experimental 3D-images under a folder "Volumetric 3D images" in my Portfolio http://astroanarchy.zenfolio.com/ )


 
Please, wait for few moments for animation to load, the size is ~7MB
The animation shows, IC 1396, a largish ionization zone in Cepheus.

AN UPDATE
08.01.2013

The astronomer Phil Plait collected an annual list of the best astronomical images for the year 2012.
This experimental image of IC 1396 was selected as one of them.

The Best Astronomy Images of 2012 
by an astronomer Phil Plait

THE LIST
My image is a sixth from the top.



Original image with details can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2011/10/ic-1396-home-of-elephants-trunk-nebula.html
Buy a photographic print from HERE

Here is an image series showing the apparent scale of the IC 1396 in the sky:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2011/07/ic-1396-scale-in-sky-zoom-in-series-in.html


All of my images can be seen in my portfolio:
http://astroanarchy.zenfolio.com/
(More of my experimental 3D-images under a folder "Volumetric 3D images")




I turned the original 2D-image to 3D by using a surface modeling software (TrueSpace).
Image is first divided to layers by its content, each layer is then projected to a 3D-surface.
To have good and realistic forms, I did use an other software, Bmp2CNC, it converts the shades in the image to a 3D-form. I have semi automated the whole process, it'll takes about 20 min. to make a 3D model like in this example is used.

A screen shot from the TrueSpace modeling software.
This kind of model gives much more freedoms to animate, than is used in this example.
A series of 24 images, with about one degree increments, are needed for the lenticular 3D print.


Tuesday, October 2, 2012

An experimental animation of IC 1340




In this experimental animation the nebula, IC 1340, can be seen with and without stars.
Sometimes it's easier to see complex shapes of nebula without stars, specially if it locates in a very dense star field. Human brains has an ability to create some quasi-logical shapes out of the random cloud of dots, like stars, and it can interferes the underlying shapes to be seen clearly. 

IC 1340 in Eastern Veil Nebula

A bi-color image from emission of ionized Hydrogen and Oxygen.

Original image and imaging data can be seen in this blog post:
http://www.astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/09/ic-1340-project-as-bi-color-from.html