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Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Apparent scale study of a rarely imaged planetary, Sharpless 216





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.


Sh2-216, A planetary Nebula in Perseus, the closest PN to Earth ever discovered
Ra 04h 45m 35s Dec +46° 48′ 30"

Image is in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur,
 G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.
This is a very large and dim object.

Images used in the series above from top to bottom



  1. Large field of view image shows an extremely dim supernova remnant at Left. Imaged with a Canon EF 200mm f1.8 camera lens at full aperture 
  2. A zoomed in version from the previous image 
  3. A closeup image of Sh2-216 with Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens
  4. A zoomed in version from the previous image 
Links to the original images, used in series, from top to bottom

NGC2264, the "Cone Nebula", apparent scale in the sky





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.


NGC 2264, the "Cone Nebula"
In constellation Orion

Image is in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur,
 G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.

Images used in the series above from top to bottom


  1. Two panel mosaic of Cone and Rosette Nebulae. Shot with a Canon EF 200mm f1.8 lens, Baader NB-filters and QHY9 cooled astronomical camera.
  2. The Cone Nebula half of the mosaic image.
  3. Zoomed in version from the previous image 
  4. A close up of the Cone Nebula imaged with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope, focal lenght ~2000mm.
Links to the original images, used in series, from top to bottom

Monday, May 30, 2011

NGC7380, the "Wizard Nebula", apparent scale in the sky





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.


NGC 7380, Sharpless 142 (Sh2-142)
In connstellation Cepheus


Sh2-142 alias NGC 7380, in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur,
 G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.


Images used in the series above from top to bottom

  1. A wide field mosaic from the Bubble and Sharpless 157 to the Wizard Nebula at Right. Images are taken with a Tokina AT-X 300mm camera lens. 
  2. A Sh2-142, the Wizard Nebula part of the mosaic, Tokina AT-X 300mm 
  3. Zoomed in version from the previous image 
  4. A close up of the Nebula imaged with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope, focal lenght ~2000mm.A zoomed 
Links to the original images, used in series, from top to bottom






IC1396 & Sharpless 129 as a Stereo Pair 3D






Parallel vision 3D



Cross vision 3D

Original 2D:




NOTE! This is a personal vision about forms and shapes, based on some known facts and an artistic impression.

IC1396 & Sharpless 129 as an anaglyph Red/Cyan 3D





NOTE!
You'll need Red/Cyan Eyeglasses to be able to see images as a 3D.
Note, if you have a Red and Blue filters, you can use them! Red goes to Left eye.





Original 2D:






NOTE! This is a personal vision about forms and shapes, based on some known facts and an artistic impression.

NGC 7000, a closeup, apparent scale in the sky






I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.




NGC 7000, the "North America Nebula", a closeup
In constellation Cygnus

NGC 7000 in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.


Two images are used for the series, first is a wide field shot with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens.
Second image, at the bottom, is shot with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with both images, wide field was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9 cooled astronomical cameras.





Sunday, May 29, 2011

The "Bubble Nebula", apparent scale in the sky






I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.






Sharpless 162, NGC 7635, the "Bubble Nebula"

Ra 23h 20m 48s Dec +61° 12′ 06″



NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.
Natural color composition from the emission of ionized elements, R=80%Hydrogen+20%Sulfur, G=100%Oxygen and B=85%Oxygen+15%Hydrogen to compensate otherwise missing H-beta emission. Star colors are mixed from the NB channels, Red=H-a, G=O-III and B= 85%O-III + 15%H-a.This composition is very close to a visual spectrum.



Images used in the series above from top to bottom


  1. A wide field mosaic from the Bubble and Sharpless 157 to the Wizard Nebula at Right. Images are taken with a Tokina AT-X 300mm camera lens. 
  2. A Sh2-157 and Bubble Nebula part of the mosaic, Tokina AT-X 300mm 
  3. Zoomed in version from the previous image 
  4. A close up of the Bubble Nebula imaged with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope, focal lenght ~2000mm. 
  5. A zoomed in version of image above.
Links to the original images, used in series, from top to bottom


This is one of the most interesting looking structures in the sky!
NGC 7635 aka "Bubble Nebula, Sh2-162 or Caldwell11, is a Hydrogen emission nebula in constellation Cassiopeia. It locates near the open cluster M 52 at distance of about 11.000 light years from the Earth.
The bubble structure is created by a strong stellar wind, a radiation pressure, from massive hot magnitude 8,7 central star, SAO 20575, it can be seen in an image inside of the bubble, off centered at Right.
Bubble is an expanding shock front inside a giant molecular cloud and it has a diameter more than Six light years. The spherical formation is expanding at speed of 6500.000 km/h, due the huge scale and distance we can't see the movement easily. In a century, the bubble in this image will be only about one pixel wider, than now! ( ~1 arc second)Strong UV-radiation from a central star ionized elements in a gas and makes them glow at typical wavelength to each element. (Hydrogen glows Red light as Sulfur, Oxygen emits Green/Blue light at visible wavelengths) 





Saturday, May 28, 2011

The "Crescent Nebula", NGC6888, apparent scale in the sky





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.




NGC 6888, the "Crescent Nebula"
Ra  20h 12m 7 Dec +38° 21′ 3", in Cygnus





Images are in HST-palette, (HST=Hubble Space Telescope) from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. Star colors are mixed from the NB channels, Red=H-a, G=O-III and B= 85%O-III + 15%H-a.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.

First image is a three panel mosaic of the "Cygnus Trio"
Second one is two panels from a mosaic.
The mosaic wide field was shot with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens.
A closeup image, at the bottom, is shot with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with both images, wide field was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9 cooled astronomical cameras.

Original images with technical details can be found here:




Friday, May 27, 2011

M1, the "Crab Nebula", the apparent scale in the sky






I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.

The full Moon



The Crab Nebula, Messier 1
Ra  05h 34m 32 Dec +22° 00′ 52", In constellation Taurus


Images are in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Hydrogen + Sulfur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + Hydrogen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as scale.

Single image of the M1 supernova remnant is used for this scale study. Image was taken with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope at ~f5. QHY9 cooled astronomical camera and the Baader narrowband filter set.

Original image with a technical data:






Thursday, May 26, 2011

Cat's Eye Nebula, study of an apparent scale in the sky






I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.

The full Moon


The "Cat's Eye Nebula"
Ra  17h 58m 33 Dec +66° 37′ 59"


Images are in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as scale.


Single image of the Cat's eye Nebula is used for this scale study. Image was taken with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope at ~f5. QHY9 cooled astronomical camera and the Baader narrowband filter set.

Original image with a technical data:

The actual nebula is very small, rarely imaged outer halo is dominating the view.






IC 1396, the scale in a sky, zoom in series


I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some of my material as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.
The full Moon



IC1396 and the "Elephant's Trunk Nebula"
In constellation Cepheus

Images are in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Hydrogen + Sulfur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + Hydrogen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as scale.

Images used in the series above from top to bottom

    1. A wide field mosaic of IC1396 and Sharpless 129, Sh2-129, at Left. Image is taken with a Canon FD 200mm f2.8 camera lens.  
    2. A IC1396 part of the mosaic, Canon FD 200mm f2.8.
    3. Target imaged with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens. 
    4. A close up of the "Elephant's Trunk Nebula" iumaged with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" telescope, focal lenght ~2000mm
Links to an original images used in series from to to bottom






Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Pelican Nebula, IC 5070, The scale in a sky, zoom in series





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some older images as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.


Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.
The full Moon



Pelican Nebula
In constellation Cygnus

A HST-palette closeup of the Pelican Nebula.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a scale.

Two images are used for the series, first is a wide field shot with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens.
Second image, at the bottom, is shot with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with both images, wide field was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9 cooled astronomical cameras.


 

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

IC 410 & 405, the scale in a sky, zoom in series





I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some older images as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.

The full Moon





IC410
An emission Nebula in constellation Auriga

Images are in HST-palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as scale.

Three images are used for the series.
First is a wide field shot with a Canon FD 200mm f2.8 camera lens.
Second image, is imaged with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8.
Third image is done with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced little under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with all images, wide field images was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9, both are cooled astronomical cameras.


Original images with technical details
1. First wide field shot:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2008/03/ic-405-410-with-color.html


2. Second  wide field shot:
3. A closeup of IC 410:




IC405
An emission Nebula in constellation Auriga

Images are in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Hydrogen + Sulfur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + Hydrogen.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as scale.


Three images are used for the series.  
First is a wide field shot with a Canon FD 200mm f2.8 camera lens.
Second image, is imaged with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8.
Third image is done with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced little under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with all images, wide field images was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9, both are cooled astronomical cameras.


Original images with technical details
1. First wide field shot:

2. Second  wide field shot:
3. A closeup of IC 405:




EDIT.
I found an older image of IC 405 & 410 from my HD, it's shot back in Winter 2008. I added it as a part of zoom in series.

Tulip Nebula, Sh2-101, the scale in a sky, zoom in series




I have shot many targets with several focal lengths. 
Due that, I will publish some older images as an image sets, with different field of view and detail levels.
The fractal nature of our universe stands out nicely by this way and it will make the orientation more easy.

Many times, it's difficult to understand the image scale of astronomical images.
Due that, I will add a Moon circle in some of the images to show the angular scale in a sky. 
The full Moon has an angular size of ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0,5 degrees.

The full Moon





Sharpless 101, the "Tulip Nebula"
In constellation Cygnus



Images are in HST-palette, (HST=Hubble Space Telescope) from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. Star colors are mixed from the NB channels, Red=H-a, G=O-III and B= 85%O-III + 15%H-a.
NOTE. The size of the full Moon (0,5 degrees) is marked as a gray circle in all of the images.


First image is a three panel mosaic of the "Cygnus Trio"
Second one is two panels from a mosaic.
The mosaic wide field was shot with a Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens.
A closeup image, at the bottom, is shot with a Meade LX200 GPS 12" reduced under 2000mm.
Baader narrowband filter set was used with both images, wide field was shot with a QHY8 and closeup with QHY9 cooled astronomical cameras.

Original images with technical details can be found here: